Empathic Therapy, Education & Living

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Mary Ashcroft's Comments

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At 9:23pm on June 1, 2011, Roelof A Bijkerk said…
Thanks...I think we have all had to deal with this, and you don't get anywhere judging the people that are responding in such truly crazy ways. It helps to remember that they really aren't processing information at all because they are so controlled by fear...and they are so serious about it
At 7:57pm on May 31, 2011, Roelof A Bijkerk said…
I understand what you are saying, and it's completely true about anecdotal information. What I was talking about is that people believe they know that someone is a danger to themselves and then feel they have the right to highly color, exaggerate information and fabricate things that never happened. This has happened with just about everyone I know that has been institutionalized, when you research it. And this isn't anecdotal, this is the people that actually were there, this is people feeling they "know" someone should be institutionalized and then feel they have the right to highly warp the information about what truly happened and then also fabricate things just to make sure that the person is institutionalized. I'm not exaggerating about this. When people are "alarmed" about another's behavior they get so drastic that they are more paranoid than the people they are concerned about.
At 5:36pm on May 30, 2011, Roelof A Bijkerk said…

HI, I reread my response and noticed a really bad spelling mistake, which I hope you saw was a mistake:

"I also actually have never heard about anyone being committed when there wasn't an incredible amount of distorted, biased information going on and almost always a whole degree of lying because they felt they had the right to distort the information because the "knew" that so and so needed "help." So, I feel that we need to in now way mirror that, even when talking about psychiatrists." This should read "So, I feel that we need to in no way mirror that..." 

At 2:34am on May 30, 2011, Roelof A Bijkerk said…
How to address the danger? Well, I was trying to also point out how much we get ourselves in trouble when we get too involved with seeing a danger. Even psychiatrists are human, and have a whole history as to why they are so blinded. I also actually have never heard about anyone being committed when there wasn't an incredible amount of distorted, biased information going on and almost always a whole degree of lying because they felt they had the right to distort the information because the "knew" that so and so needed "help." So, I feel that we need to in now way mirror that, even when talking about psychiatrists. And you have to have a truly calm collected and cool head in order to even try to address all the contrived responses and half truths you get from anyone in the mental health system.
At 5:59pm on May 9, 2011, Noel Gaughan said…
`Thanks Mary
At 9:11pm on April 22, 2011, edwin rutsch said…

depends on how you define empath..

I think most people have empathy to one degree or another.. it's the glue that connects us.

 

what's your defintion?

At 8:37pm on April 14, 2011, Steve Housley said…
Hi Dianne, I am sorry to say that I haven't had much time to check this out yet. It has been a very stressful week for me. I hope that all is well with you and the rest of the family. I am looking forward to vacation at the end of the month. Might try to stop by and visit on the way through if you are going to be home. Love you all, talk to you later, Steve.
At 5:25pm on April 11, 2011, edwin rutsch said…
yes, I  think to build a culture of empathy we can't use authority or judgement, we have to use empathy.
At 11:01pm on April 8, 2011, Doug Bower said…
I just had very minor surgery. I received a great deal of pressure to take sedatives IV for a 30 minute local anesthesia procedure. I declined. My BP went up during the procedure and I was given medication for it anyway though I probably would have been OK with knowing.  I simply wasn't informed. The administration of the medication was covered in the pre-op arrangements. Still I would have been appropriate to tell me. Medication is given so routinely during surgery that no really asks. It is taken for granted.
At 7:53pm on April 8, 2011, edwin rutsch said…

thanks Mary,., it will take all of us working together to change the culture and build a culture of empathy.  ...    every little action helps..   I hope to hear more about your ideas for how we can build a national and world culture of empathy and compassion.

warmly

edwin

http://cultureofempathy.com

At 5:06pm on April 7, 2011, edwin rutsch said…
thanks Mary, We all need to work together to build a culture of empathy - worldwide!
At 10:06pm on February 12, 2011, Ginger Breggin said…
Hi Mary, Welcome to our Empathic Therapy network ~ Very best, Ginger
At 8:07pm on February 11, 2011, Mike Mikulski said…

Mary,

No way should a teenager being in a combat situation.  Unfortunately, they are, at least in the U.S. military. Responding to upsetting or stressful situations as a teenager would, does not fit into how the military operates.  I'm not sure most "civilians" would understand how the mind of person in combat or harm's way works.

You don't have time to have a meltdown or reaction to an abnormal event.  Once you put on a uniform and are sent into combat/hostile situation, the expectations placed on you are extremely high. Lives depend on how you act/don't act.  A kid on a combat patrol through a village better not freeze if something happens. A moments hesitation can cost a life.  Now, imagine being "cocked on alert" all of the time, with no real break in the action.  You can do this for a while, but at some point, you snap. The "snapping point" varies from person to person and may come sooner or later for some.

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